<body><script type="text/javascript"> function setAttributeOnload(object, attribute, val) { if(window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', function(){ object[attribute] = val; }, false); } else { window.attachEvent('onload', function(){ object[attribute] = val; }); } } </script> <div id="navbar-iframe-container"></div> <script type="text/javascript" src="https://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript"> gapi.load("gapi.iframes:gapi.iframes.style.bubble", function() { if (gapi.iframes && gapi.iframes.getContext) { gapi.iframes.getContext().openChild({ url: 'https://www.blogger.com/navbar.g?targetBlogID\x3d12493326\x26blogName\x3dTechnology+::++State+of+the+Art\x26publishMode\x3dPUBLISH_MODE_BLOGSPOT\x26navbarType\x3dBLUE\x26layoutType\x3dCLASSIC\x26searchRoot\x3dhttp://techtrack.blogspot.com/search\x26blogLocale\x3den\x26v\x3d2\x26homepageUrl\x3dhttp://techtrack.blogspot.com/\x26vt\x3d-585212875574913163', where: document.getElementById("navbar-iframe-container"), id: "navbar-iframe" }); } }); </script>

Sunday, July 24, 2005

New Look for Hydrogen Storage

A new technique for storing hydrogen has been proposed by scientists in Canada and Germany. The method, which involves storing the gas between layers of graphite just nanometres deep, could help in the quest for practical hydrogen-storage devices for fuel cells.
Graphite can store hydrogen better than other materials, such as carbon nanotubes, because it is cheap, non-toxic and easy to prepare.

According to their calculations, thin layers of graphite or graphene -- two-dimensional sheets of carbon atoms -- spaced between 6 and 7 Angstroms apart can store hydrogen at room temperature and moderate pressures of just 10 MPa.

Complete Article

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home